Igor Kromin |   Consultant. Coder. Blogger. Tinkerer. Gamer.

There is official documentation that outlines how Coherence applications can be deployed in WebLogic. This sways towards creating GAR archives, but what if you simply wanted to use Coherence in your existing JAX-WS or JAX-RS service? Well it isn't too much different, in fact the sample JSP app does something similar. In this post I'll outline two approaches to ensuring Coherence is configured as per your application's deployment descriptors every time.

I'm going to assume a standard Maven layout for your web app, with the src/main directory that contains java, resources and webapp directories within it. There are a number of deployment descriptor and configuration files in there too as shown below.
webapp.png


To configure Coherence for your web application, the tangosol-coherence-override.xml file must be in its classpath. That means it should be present in the WEB-INF/classes directory in your WAR file. Having it in that directory is not enough however, the weblogic.xml file also needs to have the following entry in it...
 weblogic.xml
<container-descriptor>
<prefer-web-inf-classes>true</prefer-web-inf-classes>
</container-descriptor>


The above tells WebLogic to load files/classes found inside the WAR file in preference to those found elsewhere. Since a web application's classpath can include multiple locations across the WebLogic server's file system, it is a good idea to make sure that your web app loads your version of tangosol-coherence-override.xml and not some other one found elsewhere on the classpath.

The above approach works well for JAX-WS services since no additional library overrides are typically required. However if you want to use Jersey with WLS 12.1.2 or anything that forces your weblogic.xml to have the prefer-application-packages element defined the above approach doesn't work.

As per Oracle's documentation -
Note that in order to use prefer-application-packages or prefer-application-resources, prefer-web-inf-classes must be set to false.


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This is a mini-project to repair my Atari Lynx 2 by re-capping its motherboard, replacing the plastic screen cover, replacing a broken speaker and installing McWill's LED screen mod. This is the third part of the article, if you haven't read the earlier posts you can find their links below.

This article is split into five parts, as each part becomes available I'll link to it below.
  1.   Console Disassembly
  2.   Re-capping the motherboard
  3.   Speaker replacement
  4.   Screen cover replacement
  5.   McWill's LED screen installation


The final piece of work was to install McWill's LED screen kit into my Lynx. This mod wasn't cheap (95€ + 15€ shipping) but made a huge difference to the quality of the graphics that the Lynx produced. It literally transformed my 20 year old console to something that was on par with the Nintendo DS.

I received revision 2.0 of the kit, not sure what the earlier kit was like but this one was made up of the main board with its LED screen. It also came with a VGA connector which I didn't use since I didn't want to cut into my Lynx. The instructions were just a single sheet of paper. They were mostly easy to follow though I will note some discrepancies further down that had me stumped in places.
DSC02604.JPG


DSC02605.JPG DSC02606.JPG


The first step in installing this kit was to remove some unneeded components from the Lynx motherboard. Out came the desoldering wick again! These components were what I assumed a part of the high voltage circuitry required to drive the lighting tube on the Lynx's original screen.
DSC02625.JPG


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, , , , ,

This is a mini-project to repair my Atari Lynx 2 by re-capping its motherboard, replacing the plastic screen cover, replacing a broken speaker and installing McWill's LED screen mod. This is the third part of the article, if you haven't read the earlier posts you can find their links below.

This article is split into five parts, as each part becomes available I'll link to it below.
  1.   Console Disassembly
  2.   Re-capping the motherboard
  3.   Speaker replacement
  4.   Screen cover replacement
  5.   McWill's LED screen installation


With the speaker all working at the end of the last post it was time to move onto doing something about that cracked screen cover. I've previously ordered a few of these from techbabe, who doesn't usually post to Australia but made an exception for me, thanks!

Anyway this was what my screen cover looked like, big ugly crack right at the bottom...
DSC02608.JPG


This was the new replacement cover, shiny!
DSC02609.JPG


Since I had the Lynx already partially disassembled, it was just a matter of removing the screen and the speaker/button bracket so that the screen cover could be popped out. There were 4 screws around the screen itself with an additional 4 screws around the speaker/button bracket.

DSC02610.JPG DSC02611.JPG

DSC02612.JPG


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, , , , ,

This is a mini-project to repair my Atari Lynx 2 by re-capping its motherboard, replacing the plastic screen cover, replacing a broken speaker and installing McWill's LED screen mod. This is the third part of the article, if you haven't read the earlier posts you can find their links below.

This article is split into five parts, as each part becomes available I'll link to it below.
  1.   Console Disassembly
  2.   Re-capping the motherboard
  3.   Speaker replacement
  4.   Screen cover replacement
  5.   McWill's LED screen installation


In the last post I got as far as re-capping the Lynx 2 motherboard which fixed the crackling sound problem I was having but the speaker volume was still very low. I did some searching around and came across this forum post which suggested that it could be the speaker itself. I would not have thought that the speaker could be at fault, but hey whatever I thought I'll give it a try.

I did test the headphone jack first to verify that there was some sound coming out of the Lynx. There was sound in my headphones, loud and clear. So next I disassembled one of my other Lynx 2 consoles to use its speaker. I got lazy and didn't disassemble it fully so just connected its speaker directly to the console I was repairing...
DSC02594.JPG


Lo and behold, I had loud, clear sound!



So I needed a new speaker. Unfortunately Lynx 2 uses a weird 40mm 16 Ohm speaker. This isn't very common, but 40mm 8 Ohm speakers are. I decided to try one out and went to JayCar to buy a 40mm 8 Ohm 0.5W mylar all purpose speaker. Size-wise it was more or less the same, impedance of course was different and the power rating was almost the same. Overall it was close enough.

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