Igor Kromin |   Consultant. Coder. Blogger. Tinkerer. Gamer.

Raspberry Pi is a great project computer, it's cheap ($35), runs Linux (or Risc OS) and has lots of resources available aroudn it.

When mine arrived, I didn't really know what to use it for, but then it hit me: I can build an emulator box for all the NES and SNES games that I loved to play as a child.

The goals for this project were:
  • Build an emulator box to play NES/SNES games
  • Use the original NES case
  • Use the original NES controllers

I've revisited the wiring descriptions and put together a diagram that should make it easier to follow how everything was connected. You can find that information here.


I picked up a non-working NES from eBay, it came with two controllers and a game. So much for the game, it will be of no use, but the rest is what I needed. The NES is really easy to take apart and just uses standard screws.

Here it is taken apart.
CIMG3863.JPG




The power and A/V connectors were attached to the main circuit board block, it was a bit of a pain to pull them out and a part of the PCB got damaged in the process. No big deal on the damage, I didn't need the whole PCB intact.
CIMG3864.JPG


I desoldered all of the components on the A/V PCB so that I can solder in my own wiring later.
CIMG3867.JPG


The front panel with the on/off and reset buttons and the on LED is removed. I added single pin Dupont connectors on all of the wires except for the power button, there I soldered on single pin headers. The idea with the power button is to have the pins plug into the wiring I will have running from the power socket and either close the circuit or not.
CIMG3869.JPG


Testing out some of the connections.
CIMG3870.JPG


Everything from the front panel screwed back into place and connected.
CIMG3872.JPG


A quick test and the LED works! I did have to splice in a 10K resistor in the LED wiring. This should be visible on the white wire above, the resistor is mostly covered by heat shrink.
CIMG3873.JPG


Some more testing using the USB hub to supply the power to the Raspberry Pi.
CIMG3874.JPG


I took the USB hub out of its case and soldered in some wiring so it can be connected to the NES power port.
CIMG3876.JPG


The rest of the external connectors are wired in.
CIMG3877.JPG


I cut the positive (red) wire from the power port to the USB hub about half way and added the single pin Dupont connectors into it, this is where the power switch plugs in.


The wiring looks like this, the positive wire is basically spliced and the negative wire is left alone:
(+ wire from port)------[###]-----/pwr switch/----[###]------(usb hub)
|
(- wire from port)-------------------------------------------|
[###] = Dupont connector


The USB hub, A/V block and the front panel all connected and in place.
CIMG3878.JPG


Testing the connections with the Raspberry Pi.
CIMG3880.JPG


Continue reading the next part of this post: Raspberry Pi in a NES Case - Part 2 - Connecting the controllers and finishing up

-i

Please leave your comments or feedback below!
comments powered by Disqus
Other posts you may like...
Hi! You can search my blog here ⤵
Or browse the recent top tags...

Recent Blog Posts

Using DeoxIT to repair old game catridges

WebLogic Maven Plugin - How to fix the MojoExecutionException: The artifact location was not specified

jPhotoFrame version 0.4 released with a whole new layout engine

Upcycling a couple of old broken lamps to create something amazing

A custom exception mapper and writer for a RESTful JAX-RS Jersey service

How to fix Plex error - Sorry there was a problem playing this item

Jersey JAX-RS filters and interceptors execution order for a POST request

Fix your Mac - users not showing on the macOS login screen when FileVault is enabled

BMB-012 Nanoblock T-Rex Skeleton Model assembly

Writing a custom MessageBodyReader to process POST body data with Jersey

Recent Galleries

BMB-012 Nanoblock T-Rex Skeleton Model assembly

Tiny Arcade revision 6 kit assembly and decal application

Atari Lynx repair - Part 5 - McWill LED screen mod installation

Atari Lynx repair - Part 4 - screen cover replacement

Atari Lynx repair - Part 2 - re-capping the motherboard

Atari Lynx repair - Part 3 - broken speaker replacement

Atari Lynx repair - Part 1 - introduction and case disassembly

Building a custom Atari Lynx game box storage shelf unit in a day

Protecting old Atari Lynx game boxes with snug fit plastic sleeves

Monument Valley 2 is released and does not disappoint

Blogs and Friends

Matt Moores Blog
Georgi's FlatPress Guide
Perplexing Permutations
The Security Sleuth
Ilia Rogatchevski
Travelling Fairy

Blog Activity

Blog Activity