Igor Kromin |   Consultant. Coder. Blogger. Tinkerer. Gamer.

I had a piece of hardwood left over from when I built my TV unit. This piece of wood was large enough to have two people sit on it comfortably, so it was suggested to me to make it into a garden bench. However this piece had a huge void running down one of its sides, which I decided to fill with water-clear polyester resin, same as all my other wood working projects.

This is what the piece looked like.
IMG_1050.jpg


The void went from top to bottom on one part of the wood, it was close to 2 inches deep. I used masking tape and some 50mm aluminium angle to put a makeshift mould around it. This mould would remain on the wood for close to three months as I slowly filled the void.

IMG_1051.jpg IMG_1052.jpg


I ended up using about 5 kg of resin to fill the void and all the other gaps in the wood. Each layer was about 5 mm and took several days to cure. I didn't sand in between layers, just cleaned dust that collected before putting the next layer on. I did end up trapping some specs of dusk at the earlier layers unfortunately so they are visible in the finished product.



It took about 3 months to fill this void (I wasn't working on it every weekend though).

IMG_1054.jpg IMG_1059.jpg


Eventually the resin was level with the top of the wood and the void was completely filled in. At the same time all the other gaps were filled too. Even at this early stage the resin was quite transparent.
IMG_1061.jpg


After the mould and all the masking tape were off, I left the whole thing to dry and cure for two weeks because some of the resin around the inner parts of the mould was still tacky.

When all the resin was cured it was time to cut the wood down to size.

IMG_1062.jpg IMG_1063.jpg



Based on my previous experience with the TV unit sanding, I decided to take on a different approach. Instead of sanding all the resin I used a power plane to cut all the excess off. It looked quite ugly after this because lots of resin chipped, but that wasn't going to affect the final piece too much so I wasn't worried.

IMG_1064.jpg IMG_1066.jpg


After plaining I noticed that some of the resin was still not cured properly so I let it cure for another week before continuing.

Finally it was time to sand it. Most of the chipped resin started to disappear after sanding.
IMG_1067.jpg


This is it for now, I'll put up part two in the next couple of days. Part two wraps up the sanding and lacquer application as well as attaching legs and shows off the final product.

-i

Please leave your comments or feedback below!
comments powered by Disqus
Other posts you may like...
Hi! You can search my blog here ⤵
Or browse the recent top tags...

Recent Blog Posts

Tiny Arcade revision 6 kit assembly and decal application

Jersey JAX-RS filters and interceptors execution order for a simple GET request

How to stop macOS adding shadows to window screenshots

How to run Atari Lynx games on the SNES Classic Mini

Maven dependency scopes with relation to WAR file packaging and the WEB-INF/lib directory

Hacking the Sonoff B1 WiFi LED bulb to run custom firmware

What does an idle WebLogic server run on the hour to cause a CPU spike

How to open the Sonoff B1 wifi LED bulb to access its internal circuitry

Australian release SNES mini classic unboxing and a quick play through

Troubleshooting high CPU usage for JVM threads

Recent Galleries

Atari Lynx repair - Part 5 - McWill LED screen mod installation

Atari Lynx repair - Part 4 - screen cover replacement

Atari Lynx repair - Part 2 - re-capping the motherboard

Atari Lynx repair - Part 3 - broken speaker replacement

Atari Lynx repair - Part 1 - introduction and case disassembly

Building a custom Atari Lynx game box storage shelf unit in a day

Protecting old Atari Lynx game boxes with snug fit plastic sleeves

Monument Valley 2 is released and does not disappoint

Space Food - Chocolate Ice Cream with Chocolate Chips

Legeod Star Wars AT-DP kit

Blogs and Friends

Matt Moores Blog
Georgi's FlatPress Guide
Perplexing Permutations
The Security Sleuth
Ilia Rogatchevski
Travelling Fairy

Blog Activity

Blog Activity